The painting "Springs Fireplace" by Pat Lipsky

Top: The 1969 painting Springs Fireplace by Pat Sutton Lipsky. (Image provided)

Online Archive Showcases Work of AAP Alumni

Initially featuring 15 profiles—with more to come—it highlights a broad range of talent across the college’s three fields

By Beth Saulnier

A richly textured interior wall, paneled with the staves of recycled whiskey barrels, in a Baltimore art museum designed by architect Diane Cho ’73, BArch ’74.

Abstract metal sculptures by artist and BFA grad Joel Perlman ’65—so massive, they dwarf their human admirers.

The joyful, vividly hued proposal for a Syracuse botanic garden and arboretum, created by planner Emanuel Carter Jr. ’69, MRP ’78.

These works—and many more, by a dozen other Cornellians—are featured in the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning’s new online alumni archive.

An interior of Baltimore Center Stage, a 2017 project by Diane Cho.
Baltimore Center Stage’s Head Theater, a 2017 project by architect Diane Cho. (Photo by Karl Connolly)

Launched in late February, the curated archive is devoted to showcasing the work of AAP alums from the 1940s to the ’80s.

Fifteen graduates were invited to submit images and information for the archive’s initial round of profiles, with an additional 25 currently planned for future inclusion.

A pathway map by Henry Richardson
A pathway map by AAP professor Henry Richardson ’67, BArch ’68, MArch ’70, MRP ’71. (Image provided)

They represent a swath of talent that’s both broad and deep—from the paintings of colorist Pat Sutton Lipsky ’63 (a BFA grad whose work is held by the Whitney Museum of American Art, among other prestigious institutions), to the designs of prolific architect Robert Joy ’72, BArch ’73, whose projects on university campuses include Cornell’s own Tang Welcome Center and the fourth-floor renovation of Mann Library.

The archive—whose profiles are penned by current students or recent grads—is supported by a gift from architect Mui Ho ’62, BArch ’66, who is also the benefactor and namesake of AAP’s Fine Arts Library.

“I think there are many good architectural projects by Cornell alums, beyond the few who are widely recognized, floating around in this country and the world,” Ho says in an interview about the archive.

She adds: “With the new digital era, we can archive the projects of our alumni so their work can preserve the history of the college, provide references for students, and offer a tool that can continue to expand design education at Cornell.”

I think there are many good architectural projects by Cornell alums, beyond the few who are widely recognized, floating around in this country and the world.

Mui Ho

Ho’s oeuvre is among the initial 15 showcased on the site, which features images and descriptions of her work in China, India, and the U.S.

They include Sparks Way Commons in Hayward, California; dating from 1984, it’s described as the nation’s first-ever affordable housing project specifically for single-parent families.

A photo of Mui Ho looking at documents
Mui Ho at work. (Photo provided)

“Design is not something you do for yourself,” Ho observes in her profile, written by architecture student Maiko Sein ’23. “You have to think about the people you are serving.”

Top: The 1969 painting Springs Fireplace by Pat Sutton Lipsky. (Image provided)

Published March 18, 2022


Comments

  1. Pauline Runkle, Class of 1967

    It is a great privilege to be given a glimpse into the contributions of fellow Cornellians. These individuals are creating spaces to heal and to nurture the heart and soul of humanities needs. Having been a single parent, Mui Ho’s housing complex for single parent families, demonstrates a depth of empathy for a group that is often forgotten. Her work acknowledges a significant need in that community that has been unaddressed and which opens a new pathway for a community in need of understanding and support.

  2. April S Tan, Class of 1996

    Although I am in the college of arts and science I enjoy browsing the collections of alumni in addition May is Asian American Pacific islander heritage month and I appreciate looking at Miss ho’s work and also the college in her name it is with great pride as an Asian American to have an alumna particularly this house being recognized in the college itself considering that Cornell is very supportive of Asians probably more supportive than the other Ivy League schools

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