Books by Alumni and Faculty

Click on the cover or title for more information on each book. To submit your book for consideration, email cornellians@cornell.edu. Please note that to be included here, books must be published by a conventional publisher and be of interest to a general audience. Books not featured will be forwarded to the Class Notes section.

The Whole-Person Workplace

The Whole-Person Workplace

An expert on work and family issues who appears regularly in the national media, Scott Behson ’94 is a professor of management at Fairleigh Dickinson University. His latest book describes best practices in such areas as remote work, family leave, workplace culture, vacation policy, and more.

All Sorrows Can Be Borne

All Sorrows Can Be Borne

In a novel inspired by true events, Loren Meyer Stephens ’65 tells a tale that spans from World War II to the early 1980s and from Japan to Montana. It’s narrated by a Japanese woman whose husband is seriously ill, and who makes the heart-wrenching decision to send her young son to live with relatives in America.

Hugo

Hugo

The title character in this hardcover picture book for kids aged three to seven—illustrated by Birgitta Sif Jonsdottir ’03—is a gregarious pigeon who serves as the warden of a small Parisian park, tending to its human and animal visitors and visiting the nearby apartments.

Vineland Reread

Vineland Reread

Publishers Weekly calls this treatise on the novel Vineland (by Thomas Pynchon ’59) a “penetrating and nuanced work of literary criticism.” Author Peter Coviello, PhD ’98, is an English professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

How Photography Became Contemporary Art

How Photography Became Contemporary Art

Andy Grundberg ’69, the New York Times’ photography critic from 1981–1991, had a front-row seat to (as he puts it in his introduction) “the remarkable rise of photography from the margins of art to its vital center, all within a span of 25 years.”

Books Promiscuously Read

Books Promiscuously Read

Heather Cass White, PhD ’98, teaches English at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and is best known for editing several collections of work by the American modernist poet Marianne Moore. Here, she explores the pleasures of reading itself and contemplates its transformative power.